Pedigree of:
Joris Jansen Rapalje
1604-1662


___?
___?
___?-___?
= ___?
BAUDOIN
___?-___?
___?
___?
___?-___?
= ___?
RAPAREILLET
___?-___?

Elizabeth
BAUDOIN
c1560-1606
= Jean
RAPAREILLET
c1552-1606

Joris Jansen
RAPALJE
1604-1662


Notes and Links

Joris Jansen Rapalje*; b. Apr. 28, 1604 in Valenciennes; d. Feb. 21, 1662, Brooklyn NY. See the Descendants of Jean Rapareillet. Also see The Ancestors of Maria Vanderveer.

Brief Biography:

Joris Jansen Rapalje*; b. Apr. 28, 1604 in Valenciennes. a town in Northern France, long considered a Protestant stronghold in the province of Hainaut, but was conquered by Spain in the 1500s. Then, in 1677, under Louis XIV, Valenciennes was recaptured for France. Joris was born there during the time of Spanish occupation and his family was surely under duress.

A microfilmed copy of these records, now available, shows by the handwriting that the same priest recorded the baptism of Nicolas in 1598 and of his brother Georges (Joris) in 1604. He called only the latter illegitimate, as he did two per cent of the babies he baptized. See on-line The Ancestors of Maria Vanderveer, and select the 8th generation page and scroll down to the item #138 on "Joris Janszen Rapelje" [sic]. There is a list of quotes from an article by Hugh T. Law: Chapter 7, Ancestors Traced to France: Joris Jansen De Rapalje and Catharine Trico," How To Trace Your Ancestors to Europe, 1987, pp.84~86". Thus, this indicates that his genetic mother was not Elizabeth Baudoin c1560-1606, as indicated above. Therefore, the color of her block in the pedigree chart has been adjusted to gray to indicate that she may not be a genetic ancestor.

Joris was the youngest child of Jean Rapareilliet*, probably born to a woman other than Jean's wife, Elizabeth Baudoin, but possibly adopted by her. Joris did not know his father, since his father, Jean, died when he was less than 2 years old. He also would not have known Elizabeth, since she also died in 1606. It is not known if he ever knew his genetic mother, but it seems possible that his father would have employed the services of some woman, perhaps a mistress, perhaps Joris' genetic mother, to raise his family. Jean was born about 1552 in Valenciennes, Nord, France. Jean died after 1602. One source says buried on 23 Feb 1606 in Valenciennes, France. In about 1599, Jean married Elizabeth Baudoin, and she birthed 8 and raised 9 of the following children until she died in 1606:

Joris' surname, Rapalje, was a vulgar "Dutchification" of the French or Walloon name "Rapareillet". The variations of the spelling of his surname suggests that, although born in the Spanish occupied Hainaut Province of France, he may have spent some time in Walloonia, Flanders, now a part of Belgium. Once in America at New Amsterdam, he was said to have come from La Rochelle, France, indicating that he may have lived there as well, or at least had some trade in La Rochelle (possibly through Catalyntie's father). His middle name, Jansen, suggests that he was the son of Jan (in Dutch), or Jean (in French).

Joris and Catalyntie Trico were married in the Walloon (Protestant - Huguenot) Church at Amsterdam, Netherlands, Jan. 21, 1623/24. According to the book, Island at the Center of the World, by Russell Shorto (Doubleday 2004) their marriage was only four days before their ship sailed to America. Catalyntie's maiden name, Trico, is also a "Dutchification" of Tricault, her original French surname. The possibility does exist that they first came to America on separate ships, he on the Unity in 1623, and she on the Niew Nederlandt in 1624, or vice-versa. Another possibility is that Joris first arrived in 1623 on the Unity, then returned to Holland to marry Catalyntie and they both returned to New Amsterdam on the Niew Nederlandt in 1624. In the Bergen family history, published in 1876, it is asserted that they both came to the "Mannatans" on the Unity, commanded by Arien Jorsie, and were part of 18 families which remained on-board to go to Fort Orangie (Now Albany), where they lived until 1626. New research, since the publication of the Bergen Book, has Catalyntie arriving on the Niew Nederlandt in 1624, which brought a number of Huguenot refugees from La Rochelle.

Joris and Catalyntie lived in what is now Albany until 1626, when she and her husband moved to what is now lower Manhattan after Gov. Peter Minuit in May, 1626, purchased Manhattan Island from the Indians. After a few years of farming, Joris and Catalynsie opened a small tavern or "tap house" on the north side of what is now Pearl Street, abutting on the Fort, where they managed the tap-house and grew vegetables and served their guests. Later, their daughter Sarah and son-in-law, Hans Hansen Bergen, took over the tap-house, but Hans died in 1654. Joris and his wife moved to a farm in Brooklyn, where he had acquired a number of properties, in about 1655, in the area now occupied by the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Joris died sometime before 1680, since from that point onward Catalyntie was known as the "old widow from Valenciennes" as she continued to raise her large extended family and grow vegetables on her farm in Brooklyn. In 1680 a group of Labidist visitors reported that, in 1679, she was living alone, growing flowers and vegetables and had 145 descendants, soon to be 150, alive at that time.


References:


Go to the Index of ancestral surnames
Go to the Index of Names: which includes names of in-laws, half-relations, aliases, and adopters.
Go to the How to use this genealogy page.
Contact the author: e-mail link: Phillips Verner Bradford
Note: Ancestors of Phillips Verner Bradford are denoted in the text lists with an asterisk (*) following the names.